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The Collingwood Society: Trafalgar Day 2015 20 October, 2015

Posted by Molly Joyful in Collingwood Society, Cuthbert Collingwood, Events, Nelson, Royal Navy.
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cuddy_icon

“Trafalgar Day 2015”

Notice is hereby given of events scheduled for Wednesday 21st October 2015, with which the Society is associated and at which it will be represented. All members are welcome (and encouraged) to attend.

Newcastle upon Tyne
 Image1 Venue St Nicholas Cathedral (Collingwood memorial at the back of the              Church)
Time 0945 for 1000
Event Annual short service of commemoration, organised by the Lord Mayor’s Office and the Cathedral
Info Light refreshments afterwards

 

Tynemouth
 Image3 Venue Collinwood Monument
Time 1130
Event ‘Toast the Admiral 2015’ event, organised by North Tyneside Council
Info Wylam grog available here, oration to be given by CO HMS COLLINGWOOD, flag-raising by MSTS, light refreshments afterwards in the refurbished TVLB

 

Morpeth
 Image4 Venue Town Hall, then Collingwood House (Oldgate)
Time 1120 for 1130 at the Town Hall, then 1150 for 1200 at Collingwood House
Event ‘Collingwood Toast 2015’, organised by Morpeth Town Council
Info Flowers will be laid at the bust of Lord Collingwood to begin with, followed by proceedings at Collingwood House, Morpeth grog available at this one!

 

London
 Image2 Venue St. Paul’s Cathedral (adjacent to Nelson’s / Collingwood’s tombs)
Time 1045 for 1100
Event Annual wreath-laying and short service of commemoration
Info Long-established event, representation by London and south of England based members of the Society
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The Collingwood Society: Trafalgar Day 2014 19 October, 2014

Posted by Molly Joyful in Collingwood Society, Cuthbert Collingwood, Events, Royal Navy, Talks.
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Notice is hereby given of events scheduled for Tuesday 21st October 2014, with which the Society is associated and at which it will be represented. All members are welcome (and encouraged) to attend.  

Newcastle upon Tyne
 Image1 Venue St Nicholas Cathedral (Collingwood memorial at the back of the Church)
Time 0945 for 1000
Event Annual short service of commemoration, organised by the Lord Mayor’s Office and the Cathedral
Info Light refreshments afterwards

 

Tynemouth
 Image3 Venue Collinwood Monument
Time 1130
Event ‘Toast the Admiral 2014’ event, organised by North Tyneside Council
Info Wylam grog available here, RN detachment attending, flag-raising by MSTS, light refreshments afterwards in the Low Light, North Shields

 

Morpeth
 Image4 Venue Town Hall, then Collingwood House (Oldgate)
Time 1120 for 1130 at the Town Hall for a restricted event, then 1150 for 1200 for the public event at Collingwood House
Event ‘Collingwood Toast 2014’, organised by Morpeth Town Council
Info Flowers will be laid at the bust of Lord Collingwood to begin with, followed by proceedings at Collingwood House, Morpeth grog available at this one!

 

London
 Image2 Venue St. Paul’s Cathedral (adjacent to Nelson’s / Collingwood’s tombs)
Time 1030 for 1100
Event Annual wreath-laying and short service of commemoration
Info Long-established event, representation by London members of the Society

In the news:

Toast to the Hero of Trafalgar (Morpeth Herald)

A Toast to Collingwood (North Tyneside Council)

 

To that Noble Fellow Collingwood 7 March, 2014

Posted by Molly Joyful in Bounce, Cuthbert Collingwood, Family, Nelson, Online articles, Royal Navy.
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204 years ago today, Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood died off Port Mahon, on board of HMS Ville de Paris. Here’s what the “Annals of the Wars of the 19th Century. Vol. III” had to say on the matter. I find the comparison of Nelson and Collingwood to Saul and Jonathan most intriguing…!

collingwood_obituary_extract

You can read an extensive extract by clicking on the picture below.

collingwood_obituary

Today’s picture can be shared with you thanks to the generosity of our dearest Volgivagant; who of us would not have loved to sail on the good ship “Collingwood” – with a figurehead like this?

collingwood_figurehead collingwood_figurehead_draw

In honour of our dear admiral – and his beloved Bounce! – we’ve made a donation to rescue four dogs from Romania, who are already on their way to new, loving homes.

Vice Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood: Wisdom will never go out of Fashion 7 March, 2012

Posted by Molly Joyful in Books, Cuthbert Collingwood, Family, Letters, Quotes, Royal Navy, things you don't need but probably want, Trivia, Vices and Virtues.
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Vice Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood, 1st Baron Collingwood, died on 7th March, 1810 at the age of 61. Unfortunately, we couldn’t visit St. Paul’s Cathedral today as I’ve just started a new job, but be assured that “Old Cuddy” wasn’t deprieved of his annual gift of flowers. A very lovely flowerbox with red roses and berries, not unlike the one from last year, was placed on his tomb.

So rather than paying my respects in person, I’ll do so in writing. I won’t talk about naval battle strategies or politics, though. When asked why I took such an interest in some old admiral who died a gazillion of years ago, I usually say: “People with common sense never go out of fashion.” Collingwood was born in 1748, but had a more modern approach to many things and better understanding of human nature than a good number of people nowadays.

On 17 April, 1809, Collingwood wrote a letter to his daughters while aboard his ship, the Ville de Paris, anchored off Minorca. I dare say that we’d all live in a much better world if some of the advice he gave his girls was headed today. Actually, I petition for his pieces of advice to be printed on a 4x20ft banner and put up in the Houses of Parliament. I suggest neon pink vinyl, so that really nobody can miss it.

The education of a lady, and indeed of a gentleman too, may be divided into three parts; all of great importance to their happiness, but in different degrees.

The first part ist the cultivation of the mind, that they may have a knowledge of right and wrong, and acquire a habit of doing acts of virtue and honour. By reading history, you will perceive the high estimation in wihch the memories of good and virtuous people are held; the contempt and disgust which are affixed to the base, whatever may have been their rank in life.

The second part of education is to acquire a competent knowledge how to manage your affairs, whatever they may happen to be; to know how to direct the economy of your house; and to keep exact accounts of every thing which concerns you. Whoever cannot do this must be dependent on somebody else, and those who are dependent on another cannot be perfectly at their ease. (…)

The third part is, perhaps, no less in value than the others. It is how to practise those manners and that address which will recommend you to the respect of strangers. Boldness and forwardness are exceedingly disgusting, and such people are generally more disliked the more they are known; but, at the same time, shyness and bashfulness, and the shrinking from conversation with those with whom you ought to associate, are repulsive and unbecoming.

This quote was taken from the excellent book “The Five Hundred  Best English Letters”, selected and edited by The First Earl of Birkenhead, first published in 1931. I’d like to thank Esteven for the many hours of enjoyment I spent reading it.

7 March at St. Paul’s: Flowers for Admiral Collingwood 13 March, 2011

Posted by Molly Joyful in Cuthbert Collingwood, Events, Nelson, Royal Navy.
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St. Paul’s was very busy on 7 March; the usual mixture of schoolkids (mostly bored) and tourists (mostly with bored kids). I can feel with them; when I was first dragged to St. Paul’s, I also was very grumpy with my teacher, because I wanted to go shopping, for crying out loud, not spend the afternoon in a church! Well, we get older and (mostly) wiser. I overheard a funny conversation between two lads of about 14 years of age. They had to answer questions on a worksheet and set up camp right behind us. One said he wanted a “thing” like Nelson’s sarcophagus, but a cooler version, with flames spray-painted on the sides!

Admiral Collingwood’s sarcophagus probably doesn’t inspire such elaborately customised copies; you can’t even see his name unless you walk up the steps and read the inscription. We laid the flowers and held a minute of silence.

The flower arrangement was lovely, with red roses and red berries.

Next year, we’ll go for Brassica oleracea and chewing bones… ;-)

Admiral Lord Collingwood 2010: Link Collection of Celebrations, Part 2 11 March, 2010

Posted by Molly Joyful in Cuthbert Collingwood, Events, General, Online articles, Royal Navy.
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Still working my way through the mailbox. I’ll eventually reply to everybody, thanks for your patience.

More links are trickling in. I hope I can apply my google-fu more effectively this weekend, I’m sure there’s more. If you’ve been to any of the last weekend’s events and want to share your thoughts, impressions and/or pictures, please do so! You’re more than welcome. I’d also like to thank all the regulars here who helped me so much with their comments and links.

This video on youtube must be my new favourite:

HMS CUMBERLAND – 21 GUN SALUTE
Narration by Bounce!

(19, actually. Two dog barks might have been included to make for 21…!)

Some thoughts about and information by Nana – heart and soul of every discussion about Admiral Lord Collingwood:

THE NANASCRIPT

The ever-lovely Jen took pictures and generously shares them with us. Please scroll down the gallery to see all pictures and also have a look at the second page:

ACROSS THE TYNE

Meanwhile, back in London…

… flowers were laid at Admiral Lord Collingwood’s tomb, which can be found in the crypt of St. Paul’s cathedral. Pictures were taken with permission of St. Paul’s and are used here with permission of the photographers.

We’d like to thank staff at St. Paul’s for their help and hope to make this a (bi-)annual event. While Admiral Lord Collingwood probably would have shaken his head about the general idea of fuss being made about him, we feel it’s very important to keep his memory and the values he stood for alive.

Tourists made a beeline for the admiral’s tomb as soon as they noticed the flowers. “London Guides” were pulled out and consulted in considerable numbers!

Also, donations to various charities have been made in honour of “Old Cuddy”.