jump to navigation

Menorca goes Collingwood: Part II 13 April, 2010

Posted by Molly Joyful in Art, Cuthbert Collingwood, Events, Menorca, Nelson, Online articles, Royal Navy.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,
4 comments

Finally – the updated list of reports from the “Collingwood 2010 Weekend” in Menorca!

REPORT ON THE OFFICIAL COLLINGWOOD 2010 WEBSITE

An extensive coverage of the weekend with many pictures!

Helen Ridehalgh has actually modelled the Admiral looking slightly to his right and the bust has been so positioned that he is looking across the channel directly towards the Hotel Almirante – Collingwood House – the building he used as his shore quarters when in Port Mahón.

Captain Stephen Healy, representing the Festival Committee, walked in Old Cuddy’s footsteps and planted cabbage oaks. Football-wise, the team of HMS Monmouth lost against San Lluis F.C., but new friends were made, everybody kept their respective trophy and there will be another challenge in the future, and then: 6:1, at least! Artificial pitch or not! (Becks, join the Navy. This is not a request.)

The place around the bust will eventually become a small garden; what a wonderful idea. I hope the wee oaks will grow fast; Menorca can be very hot in summer and Collingwood would probably appreciate a bit of shadow. ;-)

FANTASTIC PHOTO GALLERY ON FLICKR (BY USER “ILPB”)

This one really covers every event of the weekend, from horses to ships and theatre to organ, and the pictures are of great quality. And there are hundreds of them! Needless to say, this is one of my favourites:

Picture by ilpb

HIGH-RESOLUTION PICTURE OF THE COLLINGWOOD-BUST AND PLAQUE

It looks absolutely awesome. The name of the artist is Helen Ridehalgh, btw.; there was one slip of the graver.
Or two. Three, maybe.

Lucky Jen was there and took some pictures. Thanks a lot for sharing them!

THE HORSES

THE TIMETABLE

THE ORGAN

Oh yes, the organ! It found its way to Menorca under the watchful eyes of Admiral Collingwood himself! But more about that story some other time.

Very special thanks to Nana and Jen for all the links and trouble. Much appreciated!

PS: Thanks a lot for your good wishes. It will take a while to recover, but I’m doing much, much better.

Advertisements

Menorca goes Collingwood: Trees! Busts! Tapas! 30 March, 2010

Posted by Molly Joyful in Art, Cuthbert Collingwood, Events, Menorca, Online articles, Royal Navy.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,
9 comments

While I’m still moping because Collingwood’s washstand didn’t sell in Bonham’s auction (boo! hiss!), there are more reports and pictures of last weekend’s celebrations in honour of Old Cuddy:

JournalLive: Trees planted in Menorca to honour Lord Collingwood

“The trees are a gesture of goodwill and friendship from the people of the North East,” said Capt Stephen Healy, chairman of the Collingwood 200 festival committee, who will be in Port Mahon for the weekend events.

“The trees will provide a poignant, living memorial to this great figure. They will also establish a lasting link between the North East and Menorca.”

And maybe the trees will get some company:

Collingwood tribute has roots in the Med

Morpeth Mayor Ken Brown said: “I fully support the contribution in principle, but following discussions about how the sapling will be transported it is beginning to seem like the costs will be prohibitive. It will cost about £1,000 to transport the tree so it may not happen.”

(I’m not an arborist, but how about planting an acorn rather than a sapling? It would be the authentic Collingwood-method…)

Of great interest for those of us who could not attend the festivities last weekend is the bronze bust of Old Cuddy, created by artist Helen Ridehalgh. I think it’s a lovely piece of art; I really, really like it.

Photo by José Barber

Do you want to see more pictures of Collingwood’s bust? Ships? Horses? Handsome sailors? Of course you do.

THEN CLICK THIS LINK TO SEE THE GALLERY!

And now for some links in Spanish (all with pictures):
El puerto de Maó recuerda la figura del almirante Cuthbert Collingwood

Cuthbert Collingwood, el almirante que en Maó pactó contra Napoleón

Collingwood ya reposa en la Illa del Rei

Dance: “The Collingwood Oaks” by Jen 22 March, 2010

Posted by Molly Joyful in Art, Cuthbert Collingwood, Royal Navy.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
5 comments

You have no idea how much fun it is to see all the talent and creativity connected with Collingwood 2010 celebrations. Today, here’s another truly amazing thing for you: Jen wrote a dance in Collingwood’s honour!

THE COLLINGWOOD OAKS (Strathspey 8×32)
A strathspey for 3 couples in a 4 couple set

Written for the 200th anniversary of the death of Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood on 7th March 1810.

1-8 1C turn RH and cast off one place. 1C dance a petronella turn to finish in lines of three across the dance, 1L between 2C and 1M between 3C. All set.
9-16 1L with 2M,3M and 1M with 2L,3L dance RH wheels. 1C turn LH to their own sidelines. All set.
17-24 1C followed by 2C dance down between 3C, part and cast back up, dance up to the top and cast off – 1C dance through 2nd place to finish facing 1st corners, 2C finish in 1st place.
25-32 Corners pass and turn – 1st corners turn RH and dance back to place while 1C dance a loop around them and finish fancing 2nd corners. Repeat with 2nd corners. 1C finish by passing RS to 2nd place on their own sides.

You can also find the dance in  Jen’s LJ ( source ).

(c) “The Collingwood Oaks”: Jen. Reposted here with her permission.

Admiral Lord Collingwood 2010: Link Collection of Celebrations, Part 2 11 March, 2010

Posted by Molly Joyful in Cuthbert Collingwood, Events, General, Online articles, Royal Navy.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,
42 comments

Still working my way through the mailbox. I’ll eventually reply to everybody, thanks for your patience.

More links are trickling in. I hope I can apply my google-fu more effectively this weekend, I’m sure there’s more. If you’ve been to any of the last weekend’s events and want to share your thoughts, impressions and/or pictures, please do so! You’re more than welcome. I’d also like to thank all the regulars here who helped me so much with their comments and links.

This video on youtube must be my new favourite:

HMS CUMBERLAND – 21 GUN SALUTE
Narration by Bounce!

(19, actually. Two dog barks might have been included to make for 21…!)

Some thoughts about and information by Nana – heart and soul of every discussion about Admiral Lord Collingwood:

THE NANASCRIPT

The ever-lovely Jen took pictures and generously shares them with us. Please scroll down the gallery to see all pictures and also have a look at the second page:

ACROSS THE TYNE

Meanwhile, back in London…

… flowers were laid at Admiral Lord Collingwood’s tomb, which can be found in the crypt of St. Paul’s cathedral. Pictures were taken with permission of St. Paul’s and are used here with permission of the photographers.

We’d like to thank staff at St. Paul’s for their help and hope to make this a (bi-)annual event. While Admiral Lord Collingwood probably would have shaken his head about the general idea of fuss being made about him, we feel it’s very important to keep his memory and the values he stood for alive.

Tourists made a beeline for the admiral’s tomb as soon as they noticed the flowers. “London Guides” were pulled out and consulted in considerable numbers!

Also, donations to various charities have been made in honour of “Old Cuddy”.

“His mind is calm and serene as possible…” 4 March, 2010

Posted by Molly Joyful in Art, Bounce, Cuthbert Collingwood, Events, Letters, Quotes, Royal Navy.
Tags: , , , , , , , ,
4 comments

On the morning of the 7th there was a considerable swell, and his friend Captain Thomas, on entering his cabin, observed that he feared the motion of the vessel disturbed him. “No, Thomas,” he replied, “I am now in a state in which nothing in this world can disturb me more. I am dying; and I am sure it must be consolatory to you, and all who love me, to see how comfortably I am coming to my end.”

Admiral Lord Cuthbert Collingwood
26th September 1748 – 7th March 1810

Major Commemorative Events, Tyneside 6th – 7th March 2010

Admiral Collingwood and his dog Bounce. (c) Amandine de Villeneuve; may not be reproduced without permission.

Musical Collingwood? 2 March, 2010

Posted by Molly Joyful in Art, Cuthbert Collingwood, General, Trivia.
Tags: , , ,
15 comments

No, not “Collingwood – The Musical” (neat idea, though). Yilla has a question, and I’m curious about this as well – are there any music-lovers / music historians out there who could tell us more?

Back when I was plotting to write dances for people, I came across the names of two tunes from the time – one listed as a pipe march called ‘Lord Collingwood’s Victory’, and another called ‘Admiral Collingwood’s March’.

That’s all I know about them – I don’t think either was in an online tune collection, and I’m not a musician anyway.)

But I liked knowing that they existed, and that people had wanted to write them – maybe they’ll turn up in some of the various concerts planned? :)

My google-fu only produced one reference for “Admiral Collingwood’s March” – here.

Any information would be appreciated!

Letter in an unexpected place. 23 February, 2010

Posted by Molly Joyful in Art, Cuthbert Collingwood, General, Letters, Royal Navy.
Tags: , , , , , , ,
8 comments

Then again, maybe it’s not that unexpected.

The title of this picture is “Gravestone in Trafalgar Cemetery” (Gibraltar). I can’t really tell if this is an actual headstone, marking a grave, or a commemorative plaque –  either way, it’s very touching.

Photographer: Giorgio Monteforti
(Picture released into public domain by the artist. Grazie per la vostra generosità!)

So – what did Collingwood look like? 10 February, 2010

Posted by Molly Joyful in Art, Books, Cuthbert Collingwood, Family, Lady Sarah, Letters, Trivia.
Tags: , , , , , , ,
8 comments

It’s not unrealistic to assume that some of the artists in the 18th century were flattering their customers. The absence of a smile, a clenched jaw and determined glare on a painting can be expressions of determination and a firm character or the artist’s attempt at hiding loss of teeth due to scurvy. Caveat visor.

But really, who could blame artist or customer; the wish to leave a positive image of oneself to future generations is timeless. If you’ve ever seen a picture of Madonna before and after photoshop-treatment, you know that photography can’t be trusted, either.

So, what about Admiral Lord Collingwood? Are we seeing his real face on the portraits?

I think it’s safe to say that the portraits of Admiral Lord Collingwood are more accurate than many others. While not without vanity (and really, who is!), he certainly wasn’t the man to insist on the “big hair” treatment. We know that he sent a portrait painted by Giuseppe Sorcevani to his wife Sarah, who hadn’t seen him for five years and was not pleased with the sight, to say the least. (Had she lived today, she’d probably posted a “OMGWTF” lolcat macro to her blog…)

Collingwood, who thought the artist was pretty much spot on with his portrayal, sent a snarky note to his dearly beloved:

I am sorry to find my picture was not an agreeable surprise (…) you expected to find me a smooth-skinned, clear-complexioned gentleman, such as I was when I left home, dressed in the newest taste, and like the fine people who live gay lives ashore. Alas! it is far otherwise with me (…) The painter represented me as I am, not as I once was. It is time and toil that have worked the change, and not his want of skill.
(ibid pp. 204-205)

We have to thank Captain Abraham Crawford for the following description of Collingwood. His memoirs are available for online reading here.

(…) At the time I write of, Lord Collingwood was between fifty and sixty, thin and spare in person, which was then slightly bent, and in height about five feet ten inches. His head was small, with a pale, smooth round face, the features of which would pass without notice, were it not for the eyes, which were blue, clear, and penetrating; and the mouth, the lips of which were thin and compressed, indicating firmness and decision of character. He wore his hair powdered, and tied in a queue, in the style of officers of his age at that time ; and his clothes were squared and fashioned after the strictest rules of the good old sea school, To his very ample coat, which had a stiff, standup collar, were appended broad and very long skirts—the deep flaps of his single-breasted white waistcoat, descending far below his middle, covered a portion of his thighs; and blue knee-breeches, with white stockings, and buckles to his shoes, completed his attire.

“Reminiscences of a Naval Officer, during the Late War” (1851) by Captain Abraham Crawford.
(Very special thanks to ShipRat for sending in this quote)

As this blog here is Very Serious Business, we went about the question of Collingwood’s looks with a strictly scientific approach. Means: we ran his portrait through the Facial Beauty Analyser. You’ll be pleased to hear that Admiral Lord Collingwood scored a stunning 8.94 points out of 10. That’s 0.01 point MORE than Orlando Bloom, and 0.29 points more than James D’Arcy.

Which proves – nothing. But it’s more fun than shovelling snow.