jump to navigation

Admiral Lord Collingwood 2010: Link Collection of Celebrations, Part 3 16 March, 2010

Posted by Molly Joyful in Cuthbert Collingwood, Events, Family, General, Online articles, Royal Navy.
Tags: , , , , , , , ,
2 comments

Before we come to further online reports of the Collingwood 2010 Memorial Weekend, here’s a stunning picture of the (in)famous smoke ring during the Tynemouth salute; courtesy Captain Stephen Healy:

If that’s not the perfect 10 of smoke rings everywhere, then I don’t know what is!

COLLINGWOOD 2010 – MEMORIAL CEREMONY IN TYNEMOUTH
Report and pictures by Jen

Although all the official part was impressive, I think one of my favourite things was standing there on the monument afterwards and hearing a man beside me telling the lady he was with about how…

JournalLive: NORTH EAST PAYS TRIBUTE TO ADMIRAL LORD COLLINGWOOD

He was described yesterday as one of Newcastle’s greatest sons, a Northumbrian heart of oak, a great Englishman and a saviour of the nation.

COLLINGWOOD’S MONUMENT, TYNEMOUTH
Short report and pictures by Kathy

CELEBRATIONS – COLLINGWOOD MONUMENT AT TYNEMOUTH
Great picture taken by Allan

Not reports, yet still interesting:

Morpeth Herald: COLLINGWOOD – THE MAN WHO SAVED THE NATION

Author Andrew Griffin has welcomed the Collingwood Festival after writing a biography on the hero.

Morpeth Herald: HOTEL’S ADDING AN EXTRA TOUCH OF CLASS

You’ll be pleased to hear there’ll be a “Collingwood Bar” very soon!

It will have a seating and standing capacity of 200 and is scheduled to open on April 7, when a member of the Collingwood family will cut the ribbon, followed by an official opening ceremony on April 29.

Advertisements

Admiral Lord Collingwood 2010: Link Collection of Celebrations, Part 1 9 March, 2010

Posted by Molly Joyful in Cuthbert Collingwood, Events, Family, General, Online articles, Royal Navy.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
10 comments

Just returned home and try to make my way through a shipload of mails. For now, here’s the first part with links to reports about the Collingwood 2010 celebrations. More will follow.

First stop for all things “Collingwood 2010” is the official website, where you’ll find some great reports and pictures:

Collingwood 2010 Official Website: Morpeth opens the show …

… and Tyneside celebrates …

Check the website regularly for news!

BBC News: Trafalgar cannons fired to mark 200th anniversary

Cannons which last saw action at the Battle of Trafalgar are fired on Tyneside to mark the 200th anniversary of Admiral Lord Collingwood’s death.

BBC Gallery: Admiral Lord Collingwood celebrations

The Northern Echo:  Admiral Lord Collingwood celebrated on 200th anniversary of his death

Later, at the Tynemouth Collingwood Monument, the cannons from the Admiral’s Trafalgar flagship, Royal Sovereign, were “fired” – using pyrotechnics – to signal the start of a remembrance service. The cannons were last fired in battle on board Collingwood’s vessel Royal Sovereign as it led British ships in 1805.

Chronicle Live: Hero Admiral Lord Collingwood honoured

Captain Stephen Healy, chairman of the Collingwood 2010 Festival Committee, said: “The crowds were fantastic and the weather could not have been better. I think Admiral Lord Collingwood would have been quietly embarrassed by all the fuss we have made of him.”

JournalLive: North East pays tribute to Admiral Lord Collingwood

He was described yesterday as one of Newcastle’s greatest sons, a Northumbrian heart of oak, a great Englishman and a saviour of the nation.

JournalLive: Gallery – Lord Collingwood Anniversary

Thanks a lot to Jen for providing most of these links.

YOUTUBE

Luckily for those of us who couldn’t attend the celebrations ourselves, the ever-reliable public generously shared videos on youtube. Here’s one of the parade; just click the picture to watch it:

There’s more:

Gun salute from HMS Collingwood to Collingwood Monument, Tynemouth

And another one

Also, flowers have been laid at Admiral Lord Collingwood’s tomb in St. Paul’s; picture will follow soon.

And last but not least:

Admiral Lord Collingwood is the “Treasure of the Month” of the University of Newcastle.

Ladies and gentlemen, Collingwood’s washstand has landed! 26 February, 2010

Posted by Molly Joyful in Art, Cuthbert Collingwood, Events, Family, Nelson, Royal Navy, things you don't need but probably want.
Tags: , , , , , , , ,
4 comments

As announced before, Bonhams is holding a Marine Sale on 24th March, 2010. Up for auction are many interesting items (this is particularly amazing), but of course, of  main interest to us is

AN EARLY 19TH CENTURY COLONIAL TEAK GENTLEMAN’S BOW FRONT CAMPAIGN DRESSING COMMODE, VICE ADMIRAL COLLINGWOOD

With the owner’s family since September 1892, acquired from a dealer following a sale at Deal, in Kent of the effects of the late Vice Admiral Collingwood, by the family of the late Captain Anthony Cuthbert Collingwood RN (originally Denny), Vice Admiral Collingwood’s grandson.

You’ll find a detailed description plus pictures on Bonhams’ website. Just click the amazing flying washstand above.

The estimate for this formidable piece of furniture is £ 6,000 to £8,000. I’ll be grumpy as hell if it shouldn’t fetch more than Nelson’s pot de chambre. I wish I was rich, alas I’m not, so I can only hope this piece will find a good home – that mirror’s seen Collingwood’s face many times. A fascinating thought, isn’t it?

So – what did Collingwood look like? 10 February, 2010

Posted by Molly Joyful in Art, Books, Cuthbert Collingwood, Family, Lady Sarah, Letters, Trivia.
Tags: , , , , , , ,
8 comments

It’s not unrealistic to assume that some of the artists in the 18th century were flattering their customers. The absence of a smile, a clenched jaw and determined glare on a painting can be expressions of determination and a firm character or the artist’s attempt at hiding loss of teeth due to scurvy. Caveat visor.

But really, who could blame artist or customer; the wish to leave a positive image of oneself to future generations is timeless. If you’ve ever seen a picture of Madonna before and after photoshop-treatment, you know that photography can’t be trusted, either.

So, what about Admiral Lord Collingwood? Are we seeing his real face on the portraits?

I think it’s safe to say that the portraits of Admiral Lord Collingwood are more accurate than many others. While not without vanity (and really, who is!), he certainly wasn’t the man to insist on the “big hair” treatment. We know that he sent a portrait painted by Giuseppe Sorcevani to his wife Sarah, who hadn’t seen him for five years and was not pleased with the sight, to say the least. (Had she lived today, she’d probably posted a “OMGWTF” lolcat macro to her blog…)

Collingwood, who thought the artist was pretty much spot on with his portrayal, sent a snarky note to his dearly beloved:

I am sorry to find my picture was not an agreeable surprise (…) you expected to find me a smooth-skinned, clear-complexioned gentleman, such as I was when I left home, dressed in the newest taste, and like the fine people who live gay lives ashore. Alas! it is far otherwise with me (…) The painter represented me as I am, not as I once was. It is time and toil that have worked the change, and not his want of skill.
(ibid pp. 204-205)

We have to thank Captain Abraham Crawford for the following description of Collingwood. His memoirs are available for online reading here.

(…) At the time I write of, Lord Collingwood was between fifty and sixty, thin and spare in person, which was then slightly bent, and in height about five feet ten inches. His head was small, with a pale, smooth round face, the features of which would pass without notice, were it not for the eyes, which were blue, clear, and penetrating; and the mouth, the lips of which were thin and compressed, indicating firmness and decision of character. He wore his hair powdered, and tied in a queue, in the style of officers of his age at that time ; and his clothes were squared and fashioned after the strictest rules of the good old sea school, To his very ample coat, which had a stiff, standup collar, were appended broad and very long skirts—the deep flaps of his single-breasted white waistcoat, descending far below his middle, covered a portion of his thighs; and blue knee-breeches, with white stockings, and buckles to his shoes, completed his attire.

“Reminiscences of a Naval Officer, during the Late War” (1851) by Captain Abraham Crawford.
(Very special thanks to ShipRat for sending in this quote)

As this blog here is Very Serious Business, we went about the question of Collingwood’s looks with a strictly scientific approach. Means: we ran his portrait through the Facial Beauty Analyser. You’ll be pleased to hear that Admiral Lord Collingwood scored a stunning 8.94 points out of 10. That’s 0.01 point MORE than Orlando Bloom, and 0.29 points more than James D’Arcy.

Which proves – nothing. But it’s more fun than shovelling snow.